Modern Design Auction In Melbourne


If you haven’t heard heard the news, then you will be pleased to know
that Leonard Joel Auctions in Melbourne are holding a Modern Design auction
on 12 pm Sunday 7 October, 2012. The auction features pieces by well known
international designers, but more importantly there are loads of original and
rare pieces by Australian industrial designers, ceramicists and artists.


One of the highlights has got to be the pair of Danish inspired chairs (see above)
designed by Clement Meadmore in the mid-fifties. These chairs are extremely rare,
so expect quite a tussle over these little beauties. There are also a few more rare
Meadmore designs such as the ultra rare steel rod and string recliner (see above)
and an original  Calyx light fitting. The Meadmore Sling chairs have low estimates,
but if you plan to bid be sure to ask if they are the superior U.S. model made
in 1963 or the inferior model produced in Australia during the 1980’s.

Another favourite would have to be The Montreal Chair (see above)
designed by Kjell Grant for the Australian Pavillion at the 1967 Montreal
Expo. This Australian Modern classic is rarely seen and is sure to  be scooped
up by someone with a discerning eye. Other good buys include the stunning
‘arts and crafts’ style chairs by Walter Burley Griffin fashioned in oak and
thick brown leather.  I don’t know what it is about these chairs, the design
is refreshingly simple and practical, yet they are also majestic and beautiful.

No Modernist auction would be complete without Featherston, and there
are plenty of pieces to choose from which include a range of original
contour chairs, dining chairs (see above), tables and steel furniture produced
by Aristoc. The super rare Obo Chair (see above) is estimated to fetch
$6000-8000, which seems a a lot for a foam ball but it’s scarcity really
does make it the cherry that tops off the perfect Featherston collection.

Also featured are iconic designs by  Rosando Bros and master
craftsman Schulim Krimper. The Krimper pieces are a bargain
when you consider the quality and the care that has gone into the creation
of these stunning pieces. Handcrafted and beautifully balanced, this is
cabinet making as an art form.  The Krimper lounge (see above) is a
standout piece, as it embodies all the quality and elegance that you have
come to expect from the King of modernist timber furniture.

Timeless works by Australian photographers Mark Strizic and
Angus O’Callaghan will give those blank walls some focus, whereas
ceramics by Greg Daly, Tom Sanders and Ellis Potteries will add a touch
of class to your mid-century modern surfaces and make you smile.

In some cases the estimates seem particularly low, so don’t be
surprised if these items sell for a lot more. On the other hand, I have
been caught out by not attending an auction because I though the
estimate was out of my price range, only to find out that the piece sold for
well below the estimate. When it comes to buying at auction remember
the important rules.

1. ALWAYS inspect the piece for damage and get a condition report.
2. Ask if it is original and it’s provenance.
3. Arrive early to the auction, register and give yourself time to relax.
4. Do your homework and get an idea of market value.
5. Determine how much you are willing to spend  including buyers premium.
6. Never get caught up in a bidding war that will take you far beyond your limit.
7. If you don’t win, think of what you saved instead of what you lost.
8. Have a great day and enjoy.

For more information on the Modern design Auction and viewing times
check at the Leonard Joel website.

Please note all images used on this post have been sourced from the
Leonard Joel Auctions website.

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